Focus on What Matters (Matthew 10:28)

Matthew 10 28

This verse really causes us to put things into proper perspective, doesn’t it?

We are living life on earth and it’s important what we do, how we spend our time, and the relationships we make. But in the grand scheme of eternity, our life on earth is but a blip in time. The time we spend here is nothing compared to the eternity we will spend after we leave this life. Jesus is reminding us here that we should not fear those who threaten to harm or kill our bodies, because in reality, they can’t affect our eternal destiny.

God, on the other hand, does control our eternity destiny. If we are right with God, then we have no fear about where we will spend eternity because he’s promised us eternal life in heaven. Why worry, Jesus asks, about those who can only affect our bodies? Why worry about a virus that you may or may not get because in the end, your soul is secure in Christ.

Jesus goes on in the next couple of verses to talk about God’s care for the sparrow – “not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care” (10:29). He also says that the hairs on your head are numbered. God cares deeply about his creation, of whom you, as a human being made in his image, are the crown jewel. He knows how many hairs are on your head – he knows what your deepest needs and desires are – he knows your most intimate fears.

Jesus encourages us to not be afraid of those things which can only affect the body because the soul is the most important thing we have and no one and no thing can touch that apart from God. Instead of worrying about things outside of our control, let’s spend time focusing on things that bring God glory – helping the poor, telling people about Jesus, spending time in prayer, and sharing our resources (time, talent, and treasure). When we are focused on God and his work we have less time to focus on the fears we may have.

Play Offense (Isaiah 41:13)

Isaiah 41 13

Today’s verse is just a few verses past yesterday’s verse in context. The Israelites are in exile, foreign lands, under foreign powers, and they are afraid of what is to come. They wonder if God can help them and if he wants to help them. Here, God reminds them – rather, promises them – that he will help them.

Up to this point in the passage God has been content with telling them how he will protect them and keep them safe. Shortly after our verse, however, the tone shifts to offense. God is not only going to protect his people, he is also going to fight for them.

It’s incredibly encouraging to know that the God of the universe protects us and is with us at all times. Just as it is comforting for a child to know his parent is going to do whatever possible to protect him in times of distress. But in addition to protection, God is also going to fight on behalf of his people.

There is an enemy out there who is hellbent on destruction. He wants to destroy the world, and he particularly wants to destroy the faith of the followers of Christ. The enemy wants to plant seeds of doubt in your mind about who God is and what God can do for you. And when those seeds are planted, watered, and allowed to grow, loss of faith is the result.

What God is telling you today is that he will protect you from the enemy, yes, but he will also fight the enemy on your behalf. In fact, God enlists you to his army to fight the enemy with him! Paul talks about putting on the armor of God so that you can fight the battles that life throws at you. Jesus talks about the gates of hell no prevailing over you. In His Spirit you are powerful!

You have within you, by the grace and love of Jesus, the power to defeat the enemy and fight for truth. I encourage you today to claim this powerful truth and suit up! The battle is raging all around us and with God YOU have the promise of victory! Don’t just sit around waiting for the enemy to attack – read Scripture, spend time in study and prayer, and be ready to take the fight wherever God may lead.

God’s Got Your Back (Deuteronomy 31:6)

Deuteronomy 31 6

The people of Israel are being addressed by Moses in this verse. They have wandered the wilderness for 40 years due to their disobedience and unwillingness to trust God, and now the new generation is standing on the brink of a new and potentially prosperous time for their people.

Moses has told the people about the Promised Land that God will give them, but there are major roadblocks that they will have to overcome if they are to inherit the land as promised. The main problem is that their enemies already possess the land. As Moses lists off some of their enemies in the previous verses, he then makes the statement in our verse that the Lord will not leave you or forsake you because he goes with you.

He continues a few verses later to say basically the same thing, “The LORD himself goes before you and will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged” (Deuteronomy 31:8). Moses wants to drive this point home. He knows the people will face danger and fear ahead and he wants to encourage them with truth of God’s presence.

The people of God were about to take a huge step in their development as a nation and Moses wanted them to be on sure footing. That foundation was based on trusting the Lord in all things, remembering that God would be with them no matter what.

We aren’t getting ready to conquer enemy nations, but we are facing an enemy of our own. For some, it’s simply getting up each morning and fighting depression. For others, it’s battling their own minds in the “what-if” scenarios that play out in their heads. Whatever your personal battle is, trust in the fact that Lord will not leave you in this, your time of need. Prepare for battle knowing that God’s got your back!

Brought to Safety (Isaiah 43:1)

Isaiah 43 1

This verse is found in the midst of a passage written by the prophet Isaiah, first about the terrible tragedy of the exile, when God turned the Israelites over to the Babylonians as a result of their sin. Second, beginning with our verse, God says that he will redeem Israel in spite of their sins, a result of his grace.

The Israelites repeatedly sinned against God throughout their history. But here, remarkably, we see that God promises to redeem them; promises to make them whole again. He uses personal pronouns throughout the passage (I/mine), reminding the people that they belong to Him – the Creator and Sustainer of the universe.

In times of uncertainty, we can take the same refuge in God that the Israelites did so long ago. In spite of our sinfulness, God still loves us, cares for us, and ultimately will redeem us. The word “redeem” means to bring into safety.

God is showing his grace and love to us each and every day, and he will bring us into the ultimate safety of his arms at some point in the future. No matter how bad things get, we can have confidence in the fact that in the end, God wins. God will save us from this world and all of the evil and sin that abounds. That promise of ultimate salvation should give us solace in our temporary situations that are so often filled with fear and anxiety.

God’s got this and God’s got you.