Remember God (Psalm 46:1-2)

Psalm 46 1

This verse reminds us that God is always with us. The words in our verse “very present help” really can be translated an “ever-present help,” meaning that God is ALWAYS with us. When we’re in the midst of our trouble (meaning “an event causing distress or pain”), God doesn’t leave us.

When my daughter was younger, she would often get scared at night. She couldn’t fall asleep well and then her mind would fill with what-if thoughts about terrible things that could possibly happen to her and those she cared about. Those thoughts would swirl about her head until she was almost inconsolable. She doesn’t have those troubles anymore, and it wasn’t because of logic or explaining the statistical improbabilities of her horror-filled scenarios.

What we did was have her look up Scripture regarding God’s love and protection. Then she handwrote the Scriptures out and we covered her wall and headboard with verses about God’s protection and care. When she started to feel scared, she would turn on her flashlight and read the verses that promised God’s protection. This was a problem that we as her parents couldn’t solve for her – it was one that depended on God’s Spirit filling her with his words of protection and comfort.

The following verse is also powerful: “So we will not fear when the earthquakes come and the mountains crumble into the sea” – Psalm 46:2 (NLT). As followers of Christ who are protected by Jesus, we don’t need to fear the earth when it shakes or the mountains when they crash into the sea. God’s got this and God’s got you in his hands.

When you’re in need of encouragement, go back and read the verses from the previous devotions in this series or look up your own verses about God’s promises to you in times of fear. Then write some of those verses out and put them in a place where you’ll see them. God’s Word does not fail.

Confidence in Christ (Psalm 112:6-8)

Psalm 112 7

The first question you may ask in reading this verse is who is the “he”? As I always remind people, “Context is King,” so we have to go back a verse to see the context. The “he” in this verse refers to the righteous. In fact, verse 6b says that the “righteous will be long remembered.” So then, who is not afraid of bad news? The righteous.

But who exactly are the righteous? The righteous are simply those who are in a relationship with Jesus – those whose sins have been covered and forgiven by the blood of Jesus. When you accept Jesus’ sacrificial payment for your sins, your sins are blotted out and your unrighteousness is converted to righteousness in God’s eyes.

As a redeemed, righteous, follower of Christ, we should not fear bad news! Why? Because our eternal destiny is secure in Christ! Not only is our eternal destiny secure, our present lives are also improved because we have the Spirit of God living within us and he will never leave us in our times of distress.

Verse 8 really adds the punch I love to this passage: “They are confident and fearless and can face their foes triumphantly” (NLT). As a follower of Christ, we should be confident and fearless. We can be these things because we have faith in the Lord. We cannot be confident, fearless, and trusting on our own – we need God’s assurance and assistance. When we put our trust in God instead of ourselves or someone else, then we find true confidence in life.

Think back to the story of the men put in the fiery furnace because they wouldn’t bow down to the king’s statue (Daniel 3). God gave those 3 men the courage to stand up to the king! Ultimately God choose to save them from the flames, and he promises us the same salvation when we put our faith and trust in him!

No Fear in Love (1 John 4:18)

1 John 4 18

Some people have a picture of God standing around Heaven watching us with lightning bolts, ready to strike at us any time we make a mistake. They think of God as a police officer just waiting in that speed trap ready to pull us over and give us a ticket. They think of God as the “Enforcer” – standing by to judge us at any minute.

This view represents a sad misconception.

Elsewhere in John’s first letter, he tells us that God IS love. And in that love, there is no room for fear. If we truly have accepted Jesus as our Savior, then our fear of destruction and eternal punishment should be a thing of the past. Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection offers us a chance to be a part of God’s family for all eternity – there’s no need for us to fear that God will suddenly disown us.

John says that if we do fear abandonment from God, then we have not fully allowed his Spirit to fill us with his love – we’ve never fully experienced his love. That doesn’t mean we are not saved; it simply means that we haven’t let that fact sink into the very fiber of our being.

As a parent, I know that there are times when I have to give my children consequences. But the consequences that I give are not designed to be punitive punishments just to make my kids feel bad. Instead, the goal is restoration. When children are disobedient there is a rift in relationship. That relationship must be repaired, and restitution of some sort is required. I don’t enjoy giving consequences to my children – but I know that learning responsibility and consequences is an essential part of their character development.

If we as humans understand this concept, why don’t we understand that God feels the same way about us?

God doesn’t delight in allowing consequences to happen to his children. He’s not secretly happy when we make a mistake and have to deal with the fallout. I imagine he’s discouraged in a way, that we haven’t learned how better to live our lives. But that discouragement or disappointment doesn’t equate to a lack of love. He loves us unconditionally and will never leave us or forsake us. Knowing and experiencing that love will drive out all fear because where there is true love, there is no room for fear.

Choose to Love (1 Peter 3:13-14)

1 Peter 3 13-14

During this time it’s easy to become obsessed with protecting yourself and your family. After all, it’s a noble and necessary goal. We don’t want to become sick and we don’t want those whom we love to become sick either. But the first question in this passage is important, “Who is going to harm you if you are eager to do good?”

Jesus’ command to love your neighbor doesn’t get put on pause during a pandemic. Jesus’ teaching about reaching people in love with the message of hope found in the gospel doesn’t take a break because we’re stuck in our homes. As followers of Christ, we are still to be doing what we’ve always been supposed to be doing – loving people! And Peter reminds us that most people are not going to be upset with you when you are trying to do good.

However, he says, if you do suffer while doing good, count that as a blessing and reward. Not everyone is going to respond to your actions in the way you will hope – most probably will, but some may question your motives, may question your actions, or even question your character. In those cases, Peter says don’t be worried or afraid.

Sometimes doing the right thing is lonely. Sometimes there’s no on else around who seems to be following the narrow path. But in those cases it’s even more important that we hold strong to the truth of Scripture and love people anyways. Regardless of the cost, God’s call for us is to love our neighbor, and everyone is our neighbor. Don’t let fear hold you back from doing what is good, right, and honorable.

The Money Trap (Hebrews 13:5-6)

Hebrews 13 5

During times of uncertainty people often look to different things to find their security. One of the biggest things people turn to is money. They feel like if they have enough money, they will be secure. So begins the relentless pursuit of money and all it can bring.

My family and I have recently been watching a show called Ultimate Cheapskates on TLC. The show is about people who are saving money by living and doing things in odd ways. One man participated in multiple medical research studies. One man turns the breakers off in his house at 9pm. One family all sleep in the same bed so they don’t have to heat and cool the other bedrooms. Many of them dumpster dive for their belongings, food, and even medication. It’s unreal what people will do in order to save a dollar.

When our focus in on money, whether it’s saving it, hoarding it, wanting it, or spending it, our focus comes off of the Lord. It is the Lord who says he will never leave us or forsake us. No one and no thing can ever say that with complete certainty. Our money will be gone at some point and in the end, what will it matter? You don’t see a U-Haul on a hearse – you can’t take it with you.

The next verse in this passage says, “So we say with confidence, ‘The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid’” (13:6a). When we put our confidence in the Lord, we recognize the inability of money to save us or provide security for us and we rest in him and his care. Don’t put your trust in money, put your trust in God.

Called to Courage (1 Corinthians 16:13)

1 Corinthians 16 13

Everywhere you look there is temptation. Turn on the radio. Turn on the tv. Walk down the street. Go to Facebook. Temptation is all around us. As followers of Christ, Paul reminds us to be on guard at all times, to stand firm, to be courageous, and to be strong.

To be on guard means to be awake. It carries with it the idea of not sleeping on the job. In order to live the type of lives Christ has called us to, we need to be aware of what is going on around us. We need to open our eyes and see the dangers ahead and then do what we can to avoid them. Another way to say this is don’t be a sleepwalker wandering aimlessly about with no real purpose or conviction.

To stand firm means to hold one’s ground. Specifically, Paul is saying to hold one’s ground when it comes to the faith, that is, the gospel message. Don’t be swayed by popular opinion or the latest fads – the gospel is truth and it is absolute. The message that Jesus died on the cross for your sins, rose again to conquer death, and now invites each of us into a relationship with him cannot be changed by anyone. Don’t let others distract or burden you with “gospel +” – that is, people adding to the gospel message or on the other side, people subtracting from it.

Be courageous means having the characteristics of an adult as opposed to a child. Be mature in your faith and don’t allow little things to distract you from the message of faith and hope. Don’t be lured into fear when you already know the truth.

Be strong means to become strong beyond the average. You are not average! You are a child of the King! In him you can find strength to conquer whatever battles you face, whether they be outside temptations or the inner temptations, including the temptation to worry.

As a child of God you are stronger than you know, you are more courageous than you can imagine, and you can stand firm in your faith – all by the power of the Holy Spirit living within you.

The Family of God (Romans 8:15)

Romans 8 15

I love the graphic for the verse today. It shows a new branch being added to the tree. That’s how it is when we are adopted into God’s family. He doesn’t start a new tree for each of us; he doesn’t just add a new leaf or two; he adds a new branch. When we believe in Jesus, God adds us into the family tree as full sons and daughters, not afterthoughts or slaves.

Slaves serve at the pleasure of their masters and don’t share in any inheritance. They don’t really have a voice and are subject to harshness and dominance by their owners. Sons and daughters, on the other hand, do share in the inheritance, do have a voice, and are loved and cared for by their father and mother. It is this second relationship that we have with God through Jesus.

When we believe in Jesus, the Holy Spirit fills us and God adopts us as his sons and daughters. In that adoption we are made co-heirs with Christ, given the full joys of being God’s children. Within that relationship, we can call out “Abba! Father!” an intimate word similar to “daddy,” but connoting more intimacy and closeness. It was an Aramaic term that only children were allowed to use with their fathers. It is special. We are honored to be able to call out “Abba!” to God.

As children of God, we are therefore protected by God in all things. Bad things will still happen to us, as we live in a world overrun with sin, but God has us in his arms. We are a member of God’s family and with that understanding we should not be fearful. God watches out for his family just as we watch out for our own families.

God cares for us and loves us more than we love our own children and parents. As a parent, it’s hard to imagine that anyone would love my children more than I do, but the reality is that God does! If God loves us so much, then why should we fear? Why waste energy focusing on fear when we can instead call out to our heavenly Father who fills us with his Spirit, a Spirit of courage and love?